Behavior Intervention Plan: Definition & Examples

Today you'll learn what a behavior intervention plan is, how it works, and what it's made of.

Ruben Kesherim
June 22, 2023

Behavior Intervention Plan: Definition & Examples

What is a Behavior Intervention Plan?

A behavior intervention plan (BIP) is a formal document that outlines strategies and techniques to help individuals with challenging behaviors.

The goal of a BIP is to identify the root causes of the behavior and develop a plan to address it. BIPs are commonly used in schools, but they can also be used in other settings, such as homes and workplaces.

What is a Behavior Intervention Plan?

At A Glance

  • Children who misbehave in school have a harder time learning.
  • Behavior intervention plans (or BIPs) aim to prevent behavior that prevents children from learning.
  • A BIP is a formal, written plan that teaches and rewards good behavior.

Components of a Behavior Intervention Plan

A BIP typically includes the following components:

1. Functional Behavior Assessment (FBA)

An FBA is a process used to identify the function or purpose of a behavior. This involves gathering information about the behavior, such as when it occurs, what triggers it, and what the consequences are. The information gathered during the FBA is used to develop the BIP.

2. Target Behaviors

The BIP should clearly identify the specific behaviors that are targeted for change. These behaviors should be observable and measurable. Examples of target behaviors include hitting, yelling, and running away.

3. Replacement Behaviors

The BIP should also identify replacement behaviors that are more appropriate than the target behaviors. These replacement behaviors should be taught to the individual and reinforced when they are exhibited. Examples of replacement behaviors include asking for help, using words to express feelings, and taking a break.

4. Strategies and Techniques

The BIP should outline specific strategies and techniques that will be used to address the target behaviors and teach replacement behaviors. These strategies may include positive reinforcement, prompting, and modeling.

5. Data Collection

The BIP should include a plan for collecting data to monitor progress. This may involve taking data on the target behaviors and replacement behaviors, as well as the effectiveness of the strategies and techniques used.

Examples of Behavior Intervention Plans

Here are some examples of behavior intervention plans:

1. John's BIP

John is a 10-year-old student who has difficulty staying on task and completing his work. His BIP includes the following components:

  • FBA: John's behavior occurs when he is given a task that he perceives as difficult or boring.
  • Target Behaviors: John's target behaviors are off-task behavior and incomplete work.
  • Replacement Behaviors: John's replacement behaviors are asking for help and using a timer to stay on task.
  • Strategies and Techniques: John's BIP includes the use of positive reinforcement, such as earning points for staying on task and completing work, as well as prompting and modeling.
  • Data Collection: John's progress is monitored by taking data on his on-task behavior and completed work.

2. Sarah's BIP

Sarah is a 7-year-old student who has difficulty following directions and staying in her seat. Her BIP includes the following components:

  • FBA: Sarah's behavior occurs when she is given a task that she perceives as difficult or when she is not given enough attention.
  • Target Behaviors: Sarah's target behaviors are noncompliance and out-of-seat behavior.
  • Replacement Behaviors: Sarah's replacement behaviors are following directions and staying in her seat.
  • Strategies and Techniques: Sarah's BIP includes the use of positive reinforcement, such as earning stickers for following directions and staying in her seat, as well as prompting and modeling.
  • Data Collection: Sarah's progress is monitored by taking data on her compliance and in-seat behavior.

Behavior Intervention Plan Template

A BIP template can be a helpful tool for creating a consistent and effective plan. Here is an example of what a BIP template might include:

1. Student Information

  • Name
  • Age
  • Grade/Class
  • Date of Birth

2. Team Members

  • Name and role of each team member involved in the development and implementation of the BIP.

3. Functional Behavior Assessment (FBA)

  • A brief summary of the FBA process and results.

4. Target Behaviors

  • A list of target behaviors, including a clear definition and examples.
  • The frequency and duration of the behavior.
  • The settings in which the behavior occurs.

5. Replacement Behaviors

  • A list of replacement behaviors, including a clear definition and examples.
  • How replacement behaviors will be taught to the individual.

6. Strategies and Techniques

  • A list of strategies and techniques that will be used to address the target behaviors and teach replacement behaviors.
  • How these strategies will be implemented.
  • Who will implement them.

7. Reinforcement Plan

  • A plan for positive reinforcement, including specific rewards or privileges that will be earned for exhibiting appropriate behavior.

8. Data Collection Plan

  • A plan for collecting data to monitor progress, including who will collect the data, how often it will be collected, and how it will be analyzed.

By using this BIP template, teams can ensure that all necessary components are included in the plan and that everyone involved is on the same page regarding goals, strategies, and data collection procedures.

How do you write a behavior intervention plan?

Writing a behavior intervention plan (BIP) can be a complex process that requires careful planning and attention to detail. The first step in writing a BIP is to conduct a functional behavior assessment (FBA) to identify the function or purpose of the target behaviors.

Once the FBA is completed, the team can start developing strategies and techniques to address the behaviors and teach replacement behaviors.

When writing a BIP, it's important to clearly define the target behaviors and replacement behaviors.

These should be observable and measurable so that progress can be monitored over time.

The BIP should also outline specific strategies and techniques that will be used to address the target behaviors, such as positive reinforcement or prompting.

In addition, it's essential to create a plan for collecting data to monitor progress.

This may involve taking data on the target behaviors and replacement behaviors, as well as the effectiveness of the strategies and techniques used. Data collection should be done regularly so that adjustments can be made if necessary.

It's also important to involve all relevant team members in the development of the BIP, including parents or caregivers if appropriate.

Collaboration among team members is key to ensuring that everyone is on board with the goals of the plan and understands their role in its implementation.

Finally, it's crucial to review and update the BIP regularly based on new information or changes in circumstances.

By doing so, teams can ensure that they are using effective strategies and techniques that are tailored to meet individual needs.

Conclusion

A behavior intervention plan is a valuable tool for addressing challenging behaviors.

By identifying the function of the behavior and developing a plan to address it, individuals can learn more appropriate behaviors and improve their overall functioning.

If you are working with someone who has challenging behaviors, consider developing a behavior intervention plan to help them succeed.

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